Youth Service America: New Resource to Fight Childhood Hunger

image from d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.netYSA (Youth Service America) – a national nonprofit that encourages and facilitates community service among youth. Published by YSA and Sodexo Foundation, A Teacher’s Guide to Engaging a New Generation of Anti-Hunger Leaders, demonstrates how addressing childhood hunger with students benefits the community and students.

It’s also an exciting opportunity for teens to present to their teachers who can use the guide’s tips to implement service-learning at school.

From leading food drives and fundraisers to successfully lobbying for school feeding programs, these teachers and their students are demonstrating significant increases in academic engagement while making a real difference in their communities. 

Featuring success stories and practical tips from K-12 teachers, the guide includes examples of alignment with Common Core and other academic state standards. 


Bridegroom Lesson Plan: Teaching LGBT Civil Rights

image from www.reellifewithjane.comThis lesson, based on the documentary film Bridegroom, will help students better understand the issues concerning the disparity of civil rights extended to different communities in American society.

The film also addresses student strategies for coping with bullying and overcoming feelings of social isolation.

The lesson is also aligned to McREL learning standards, contains project based learning activities and a discussion guide for educators. 

These learning materials have been released under a Creative Commons license and may be shared and downloaded for educational and non-profit use, with attribution.

 

LESSON MATERIALS

To complete this lesson, students will need access to the following:

ADDITIONAL TEACHER MATERIALS & RESOURCES

 Bridegroom Lesson Plan

 


ZABRA #BeCyberAware Twitter Chat: Social Media and Digital Parenting Resource List

Becyberaware

One of the things I enjoy most about my work is having the opportunity to talk with parents, educators and brands to dispel some of the myths or fears around teen use of social media.

Tonight I’m going to be participating in a digital parenting Twitter chat hosted by Zabra that will be moderated by Josh Shipp.

The event starts at 7pm EST and you can participate through the hashtag #BeCyberAware. I hope you’ll join us for a lively and informative discussion.

No matter the audience, my message is pretty consistent: Don't panic! I'm frequently asked to share some of my favorite digital teens & parenting links, tips and other resources.

So here we go! I've sorted through my bookmarks and tweets and put together this (hopefully) handy handout. Feel free to tweet it or share it with anyone you think would find it helpful.

.:SOCIAL MEDIA & TEENS RESOURCES:.

Cyberbullying: A Sociological Approach  http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2013/04/cyberbullying-a-sociological-approach.html

Young Adults Communication on Social Media
http://www.scribd.com/doc/31555455/Young-Adults-Communication-on-Social-Networking-Websites

INFOGRAPHIC: Golden Rules for Social Media Use by Teens  http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2013/07/infographic-golden-rules-for-social-media-use-by-teens.html

INFOGRAPHIC: Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & Snapchat –How Teens Use Social Media  http://www.businessinsider.com/infographic-how-facebook-could-be-unraveled-by-mobile-first-teens-2013-4

Southern Poverty Law Center | There Are No Bullies http://www.tolerance.org/magazine/number-45-fall-2013/there-are-no-bullies

Southern Poverty Law Center | Bullying Quiz http://www.tolerance.org/lesson/bullying-quiz

Facebook Lets Teens Post Publicly: Why That's a Good Thing http://huff.to/19QNvvK

Digital Citizenship Includes Rights as Well as Responsibilities http://huff.to/9JoWlm

Beware of the Internet Safety Industrial Complex http://www.connectsafely.org/beware-internet-safety-industrial-complex/

INFOGRAPHIC: How Millennials Are Using Social Media for Good  http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2013/10/infographic-millennials-use-social-media-for-good.html

INFOGRAPHIC: Teens, Social Media & Privacy  http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2013/05/infographic-teens-social-media-and-privacy.html

Alert: Your SnapChat Photos Aren’t So Secret http://www.businessinsider.com/alert-your-secret-snapchat-relationships-arent-so-secret-2013-9

 

.: FACEBOOK RESOURCES:.

Facebook for Educators & Community Leaders Guide  http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2013/10/facebook-for-educators-and-youth-community-workers-guide.html  

Facebook for Educators Handouts
http://www.scribd.com/collections/2978485/Facebook-101

Facebook 101: Digital Citizenship
http://www.scribd.com/doc/66447985/Facebook-101-Digital-Citizenship

It’s Always Sunny on Facebook
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/cat-del-valle-castellanos/its-always-sunny-on-faceb_b_4150090.html?

 

.: RESOURCES FOR YOUTH IN CRISIS:.

The CDC reports that 60 percent of high school students claim that they have though about committing suicide, and around nine percent of them say that they have tried killing themselves at least once.

Whatever the causes of teen suicide, it is important to note that the pressures of teenage living can lead to suicide. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL):

  • 19.3 percent of high school students have seriously considered killing themselves.

  • 14.5 percent of high school students made actual plans for committing suicide,

  • 900,000 youth planned their suicides during an episode of major depression.

Many times parents may not know that their child is suffering from depression or suicidal thoughts. There are so many resources available for teens in crisis. Here are some organizations leading the charge to help teens in crisis.

It's important to have the discussion with your kids to let them know if they or one of their friends are suffering from depression or threatening to harm themselves they need to immediately tell an adult, teacher or direct them to one of these crisis providers. If they feel there is an eminent threat, call 911.

Facebook 101: How To Report Suicidal Intentions http://www.scribd.com/doc/75718714/Facebook-101-How-to-Report-Suicidal-Expressions

Crisis Text Line: Get Help Now http://www.crisistextline.org/get-help-now/

ReachOut USA http://us.reachout.com/

Trevor Project: Warning Signs of Suicide http://www.thetrevorproject.org/pages/warning-signs  

Trevor Project: Get Help Now http://www.thetrevorproject.org/pages/get-help-now

To Write Love on Her Arms: Get Help Now http://twloha.com/find-help

 

.: RESOURCES ON TV & OTHER MEDIA:.

Real to Me: Girls and Reality TV http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2011/11/real-to-me-girls-and-reality-tv.html

Reality TV Tip Sheet for Parents http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2011/11/real-to-me-reality-tv-tip-sheet-for-parents.html

What Pop Culture is Teaching Your Boys About Masculinity  http://www.blogtalkradio.com/progressive-parenting/2011/04/19/what-pop-culture-is-teaching-your-boys-about-masculinity

Boys, the Media and Body Image: An Open Letter to The Ellen Show http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2011/04/media-boys-body-image-pop-culture-an-open-letter-to-the-ellen-show.html

 

.:DIGITAL PARENTING RESOURCES:.

Parents Guide to Facebook
http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2010/11/a-parents-guide-to-facebook.html

48% of Parents Believe the Internet is a Good Contribution to Their Children’s Lives http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2012/02/survey-48-of-parents-believe-the-internet-is-a-good-contribution-to-their-childrens-lives.html

Social Networking Tips for Parents http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2010/10/social-networking-facebook-privacy-tips-for-parents.html

Empowering Parents Through Technology http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2010/09/research-empowering-parents-through-technology.html

Facebook Security and Safety Resources for Parents http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2010/04/facebook-security-and-safety-resources-for-parents-teachers-teens.html

Facebook for Parents http://www.facebookforparents.org/

Connecting with the Facebook Parenting Duo
https://www.facebook.com/notes/facebook/connecting-with-bj-fogg-and-linda-fogg-phillips-the-facebook-parenting-duo/96616137130

Why Anti-Bullying Programs Are Failing http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2013/02/why-anti-bullying-programs-are-failing-brooks-gibbs.html

INFOGRAPHIC: School Bullying http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2012/01/infographic-school-bullying.html

What Parents Need to Know About Ask.fm & Kik http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/parents-know-ask-fm-kik-144900812.html


Study: 63% of College Students Actively Using Facebook or Twitter While Watching TV

Mobile is having the biggest impact on how college students apportion their screen time. Daily time spent on the computer and watching TV decreased in 2013, while daily time spent with the mobile phone and tablet were up by about 18 minutes each, compared with 2012.

But even if daily time spent watching TV is diminishing, a considerable 60% of college students reported owning a flat-screen TV; and TV viewing was still a major portion of students’ media time, clocking in at 2.8 hours per day. While time spent on the computer or mobile may be higher, activity on these devices can run the gamut—from using a word processing program for schoolwork to making a phone call.

image from www.emarketer.com

By comparison, when students turn on the TV, it is to watch a program, even if using other devices is a corollary part of the experience.

The study found that eight out of 10 college students reported using a second screen at least a few times a week while watching TV. Only 13% did so less than once a week, or not at all.

The most popular activity students engaged in while watching TV was using Facebook or Twitter, at 63% of respondents. Social TV can be boon to TV marketers and advertisers, but there is always the possibility that social networks are merely distractions from TV content.

Surfing the web was the next most common activity while watching TV, at 58% of respondents, while half also reported playing games. Schoolwork wasn’t completely forgotten while students vegged out in front of the television, though—37% said they did homework or research while watching TV.

And in a sign that the second screen may be an opportunity for TV marketers and advertisers to gain student viewers’ extra attention, about one-quarter of students looked up the TV schedule on a second screen, and about the same percentage shopped. (Source)

 

 


MTV Study: 57% of Millennials Like to Take a Break from Technology to Make Things with Their Hands

Keep_calm_and_carry_onIn a recent survey, MTV Insights set out to understand the younger end of the Millennial demo, 13-17 year olds, who will soon move into the “sweet spot” of MTV’s core target demographic of 18-24 year olds. 

This is a landmark generational study that builds on MTV’s long legacy of deeply understanding their audience, as part of an effort to constantly reinvent ourselves and stay at the bleeding edge of youth culture.

One of the most interesting findings?

Of those who repsonded, 57% reported that they like to take a break from technology to make things with their hands…and 82% agree “when I’m stressed or overwhelmed, I like to stop and just do one thing at a time." As Julia, 17 puts it “When I craft I’m in the zone, it really soothes me."

With social media, crafts & baked goods are granted a “second life" and serve an important function in helping hone one’s personal self-brand. We see teens today even more adept at developing their unique persona from a young age, realizing both the need to stand out to get social media likes and, moreover, showcase a unique side to get noticed in a highly competitive college admission process. 

Why are younger Millennials so stressed?

They came of age in an economic downturn, seeing college grads struggling with huge student loan debt and living through a cascade of social media-amplified tragedies like Hurricane Sandy and Sandy Hook. For them, life has always been a 24/7 social media show.

Younger Millennials’ “adaptive survival strategies”

Life-Prepping

These pragmatic youth are natural preppers in the face of an unpredictable world – whether planning for physically safety in light of violence or prepping for their futures in a more uncertain economic climate.

Accustomed to high school intruder drills, they are always in “exit strategy” mode, withover a third agreeing they “plot out escape plans when in public places, because of events like Sandy Hook.” Although half are scared of violence at school, they seem to have adopted a practical “Keep Calm and Carry On” mentality.

Mono-tasking

YMs are consciously taking time to self-soothe (a classic coping mechanism from hyper-stimulation) disconnect, de-stress, de-stimulate and control inputs. They “mono-task” and focus on immersive hands-on activities like baking, sewing or crafting. They claim their dependence on social media is overrated: one girl says “My parents Facebook more than I do.” 

  • 8 in 10 young Millennials agree that “Sometimes I just need to unplug and enjoy the simple things”
  • 82% agree “when I’m stressed or overwhelmed, I like to stop and just do one thing at a time”
  • 57% like to take a break from technology to make things with their hands
  • 54% of 14-17 year old girls say baking makes them feel less anxious

Hyper-Filtering

This is the first generation of “digital latchkey kids.” Though increasingly physically protected by parents, teens’ web behavior is not as closely monitored. But like the Gen X Latchkey Kids who created their own rules and regimes while parents worked, youth today are surprisingly filtering out what’s overwhelming to them online: avoiding certain Youtube videos or sites that they think are gross, inappropriate or disturbing.

They’re slimming down their social networks and finding niche/private places to share in a controlled environment, whether it’s Snapchat or a locked Instagram feed.

Unlike older Millennials who were pioneers in the “Wild West of social media,” today’s teens are “tech homesteaders” – they’re more savvy about how to use the internet, build "gated" groups, "hide in plain view", curate and filter.

Source: MTV Insights | The New Millennials Will Keep Calm and Carry On


Infographic: Golden Rules for Social Media Use by Teens

The British Council is marking Social Media Day 2013 with a set of five golden rules to help parents and educators keep kids safe on social media.

Every year the British Council engages directly with up to two million children globally, and seven million indirectly through teaching, exams, programmes, and projects. The organisation is committed to keeping children safe and protecting them from all forms of harm and abuse.

image from www.britishcouncil.org


Trend Watch: What do your Instagram posts say about you? It's high school all over again.

PromagramHow you see the world is at the heart of Instagram, turning it into the digital version of high school, complete with its own cliques and cast of characters.

If you think about it, it’s not a surprise. After all, the idea at the heart of the social network is to use photos as a unique expression of your personality.

So when you choose what to capture and how to filter to get the right effect, you’re not just composing a shot, you’re revealing who you are. And like high school, those masterpieces peg you into broad archetypes, creating a Breakfast Club 2.0, if you will, for the 21st century.

Instead of jocks and cheerleaders roaming the halls or the cool clique smoking in the bathroom, you have visionaries, fashionistas, artistes and proud parents, each with their unique slant on the world, as well as hidden neuroses that make them human.

No matter what effect you lean towards or how much you crop, ultimately, you filter your sense of identity through the same lens that started to develop in high school — and it’s what you carry through life, whether you realize it or not.

So where do you fit in? What do your Instagram posts say about you?

Photo Credit: eminic23


Infographic: 7 Types of Social Media Fans

U.S. consumers spend an average of 37 minutes a day on social media sites, according to eMarketer, and much of that activity involves brands and products. Consumers do everything from follow brand pages looking for deals to sharing their positive and negative experiences with the world.

It’s critical for marketers to understand as much as they can about these social media consumers. This week’s infographic breaks them down into seven major types, gives insights into their thinking and behavior, and shares tips on how to market effectively to each group.

Here are some of the stats on social media users:

  • 70% trust brand/product recommendations from friends
  • 49% follow brand pages for deals, specials and promotions
  • 45% are likely to share negative experiences with brands/products on social media
  • 42% who contact brands on social media expect a response within an hour

image from cdn.pamorama.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Yahoo! Advertising Blog


Trend Watch: Is Teen TXTNG Killing Language? [VIDEO]

Does texting mean the death of good writing skills? John McWhorter posits that there’s much more to texting -- linguistically, culturally -- than it seems, and it’s all good news.

In this TED talk, linguist John McWhorter thinks about language in relation to race, politics and our shared cultural history.


Cyberbullying: A Sociological Approach [RESEARCH]

image from www.igi-global.comSocial media and text messaging have assumed a dominant role in communication among adolescent society. And, as common in teenage social environments, these circumstances often involve online teasing and harassing. This has become known as “bullying.” 

Delaware state Attorney General, Beau Biden, describes cyber bullying as a communication that “interferes with a student's physical well-being, is threatening or intimidating, or is so severe, persistent, or pervasive that it is likely to limit a student's ability to participate in or benefit from the educational programs of the school.”

According to Delaware Online, the state recently implemented a law enforcing that schools penalize cyber bullying issues the same as they would for incidents that happen within school walls. 

Many states have begun to implement similar laws enforcing stricter punishments for those engaged in cyber bullying, and sometimes the victims are not only teens. NPR recently addressed a North Carolina law that was passed to protect teachers against bullying from their students.

A teacher at the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School had a student create a fake Twitter account under the teacher's identity, and posted offensive comments. Under new laws, students charged with such offenses could potentially face a month in jail and fines of up to $1,000.00. 

The recent International Journal of Technoethics article “Cyberbullying: A Sociological Approach” evaluates the concepts of bullying and cyber bullying and addresses the emerging nature of these occurrences: “Cyberbullying has become a major social concern because it raises questions about the ethical use of technology.

In recent years, this has been the subject of research and information and prevention activities for different groups such as governmental and non-governmental organizations and schools and parents’ associations to protect against the misuse of technology.” 

Written by José Neves and Luzia de Oliveira Pinheiro of the University of Minho, Portugal, the article features studies evaluating Portuguese University students in observation and focus groups, interviews, and investigations that aims to explore and define the characteristics of cyberbullying in Portugal. 

Cyberbullying a Sociological Approach


Search, Music and Social Networking Among Top Activities of UK Youth

image from www.futurity.orgUK teens have a significant presence online and are at the leading edge of many digital behaviors, according to a survey conducted by Research Now and initiated by K&A BrandResearch.

When UK teens go online—whether via PC or mobile—using search engines to seek out information is their No. 1 activity, in line with the ubiquity of this action among older age groups as well.

The next two most popular activities showed the ways in which teens’ digital priorities may somewhat diverge from older consumers.

Just about 80% of UK teens said they went online to visit social networks. And another seven out of 10 used the internet to listen to music. These responses beat out email, watching video and playing games as teens’ primary digital activities.

image from www.emarketer.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Read the rest of the article over on eMarketer

 


Mobile Youth: Graham Brown on the Voices of a Mobile Generation

image from ecx.images-amazon.com

Graham D. Brown, an internationally recognized expert on mobile technology, wants you to know that just about everything you think you know about about kids, mobile phones and technology is wrong.

No really.

In his new book, Mobile Youth: Voices of Mobile Generation, Graham brings years of expertise working in the communications and youth marketing space, coupled with interviews with youth from around the world, into a compelling exploration of how the mobile youth culture revolution is driving our increasingly social and mobile future.

It's Not About Technology, It's About Relationships

While news outlets run stories warning parents of the dangers of teen ‘internet addiction’, social media and texting, (most often during ‘sweeps week’ to garner eyeballs and advertising dollars) Graham takes a more nuanced, balanced and global look at the behaviors and sociological drivers behind these mobile trends.

The book contains several case studies of how youth---from Beijing, Tokyo, L.A. and even Amish Country in rural Pennsylvania---use mobile phones as a way to connect with their families, teachers and, most importantly, their peers.

As Brown points out, the most important thing any brand, marketing campaign or youth-focused organization can do is help consumers connect with their peers. The most successful brands, whether it’s a mobile tech firm like Samsung, a food truck in Los Angeles or social media company like Twitter, provide consumers with a way to connect with each other, which in turn creates value, relevance and stickiness for your product.

And this is the real secret sauce behind of why mobile devices have become our most valuable possessions. In the end for today’s youth, it’s about using technology (mobile, social) to connect people to their friends, passions and community.

Simply stated, the emotional connection they have with their mobile phone isn’t so much about technology, it’s about relationships.

Kids and Technology: Same Behavior, Different Tools

The other important lesson, this time for parents and educators, is to take a step back and release that teen behavior hasn’t changed from when they were kids, just the tools and technology.

Think of it this way: twenty years ago, teens hung out at the mall to share ‘status updates’, stalk and make friends and, occasionally, get into trouble. And don’t forget the hours upon hours that were spent talking on the phone (the one with the curly cord) and watching TV.

These youth behaviors still happen, but now the mall is out and Facebook is in. Hours on the phone tied to the wall has been placed with SMS, KIK and Twitter. Wasting time watching TV is out and wasting time watching Hulu and YouTube is in.

Mobile Youth: Voices of Mobile Generation is a must read for anyone--youth marketers, parents, educators, youth pastors--wanting to garner a better and deeper understanding of the emotional relationship between young people and their mobile phones.

About Graham D. Brown

  • Since witnessing the growth of youth media and technology having lived in Japan in the early 90s, Graham, along with business partner Josh Dhaliwal has helped grow mobileYouth to serve over 250 clients in 60 countries worldwide - names such as Vodafone, Nokia, Coke, McDonald's, Telenor, Red Bull, Nike, Monster Energy, Orange, O2, Verizon, Boost Mobile, the UK government and the European Commission.
  • Graham is a regular public speaker and has presented at the 3GSM World Congress, Barcelona and been interviewed on CNN, CNBC, BBC TV and Radio. His work has also featured in the Wall Street Journal, Financial Times and the Guardian. 
  • He is author, Director and Founder, mobileYouth and Chairman & Founder of The Youth Marketing Academy. Business author & speaker on the psychology of communication and media. 
  • Graham also hosts the youth marketing stream on Upstart Radio and mobileYouth's own TV channel. Graham is also a judge on the Mobile Marketing Association's Award Panel, advisory board member to UNICEF on their mobile media strategies and an advisor to the Global Youth Marketing Forum in India.

All Eyes East: Mary Bergstrom on Chinese Youth, Technlology & Social Networking

image from www.thebergstromgroup.comThe rise of China as a world power has been well documented and is nothing short of amazing.

While most people focus their attention and analysis on the political and economic changes taking place in China, very few have taken a look at the generation driving this economic transformation.

Enter Mary Bergstrom, principal of The Bergstrom Group, an insights consultancy that helps companies to leverage trends, develop new products and localize international brands for the Chinese consumer market.

China's youth population is composed of 500 million under the age of 30 and is poised to play an even bigger role in shaping the global economy and impacting youth culture.

The 'new China' is being shaped by a generation that loves exploring new identities online, playing video games and staying connected via social networks. A generation who, at times, also struggles to reconcile the generational values of 'new China' with those held by their parents and grandparents.

Sound familiar?

In her new book, All Eyes East: Lessons From The Front Lines of Marketing to China's Youth, Mary shares her many years of experience and insight studying Chinese youth culture and helping some of the largest companies in the world connect with Chinese youth consumers.

For me, one of the most interesting aspects of All Eyes East, looked at the way Chinese youth use technology, online communities and social networking.

In many ways Chinese youth use of technology mirrors the experience of youth around the world. But as Mary points out, there are some very interesting and uniquely Chinese uses of technology.

Some of the key insights on Chinese youth, technology & virtual communities:

  • BlogCN, launched in 2002, became the first free blog service that allowed Chinese youth with a risk-free platform to explore new identities
  • Blogging and social networking has allowed Chinese youth to challenge notions about sex, gender and socially acceptable behaviors
  • In China, anonymity has led to safe and highly creative collaboration among youth. One key example of this is a meme sparked by Xiao Pang who had his identity borrowed and then reincarnated online where it sparked millions of clicks
  • In the 90s, Chinese youth developed a new cyber Martian language that allowed them to  self-select who is 'in' and who is 'out'
  • Young Chinese mothers aren't waiting for a product to define or help them manage motherhood. Instead these digitally savvy moms are networking online, protesting brands that abuse their trust and forming parenting groups on social networking site QQ
  • It is very popular and common for Chinese youth to create profiles on different social networking sites based on pursing specific interests and testing new identities
  • Renren, a popular social networking site, allows couples to create and manage profiles, allowing them to present themselves with others as a team
  • Popular poses for profile photos include: two fingers n a "V" gesture, puckering for a kiss and making a heart with their hands. Doing so helps Chinese girls distinguish themselves from the singularity of the masses

Mary has compiled an impressive and unprecedented body of research on doing business in China, its burgeoning youth culture and has provided companies and organizations who want to reach this influential market with a clear roadmap to success.

All Eyes East is a must read for anyone--CEOs, corporate marketing teams and MBA students alike--who wants to do business in China.

Related


How Texting Can Save Teen Lives

image from crisistextline.orgWhen Nancy Lublin, CEO of the teen social change organization DoSomething.org, started texting teenagers to help with her social advocacy organization, what she found was shocking -- they started texting back about their own problems, from bullying to depression to abuse.

Last year, Nancy and DoSomething.org started using text messaging to market these campaigns. They text over 250,000 teens a week. And have found texting to be 11x more effective than email.

DoSomething.org is a charity that runs national campaigns impacting causes teens care about. For example, Teens for Jeans collected more than 1mil pairs of jeans for homeless youth. Give a Spit registered 15,000 new donors for the bone marrow registry--and has already saved 8 lives!

Her new project is a text-only crisis line, and the results might be even more important than she expected.

Take 5 minutes and watch this video. It will literally change the way you look at texting.

 

Here's How To Help

As a startup subsidiary of DoSomething.org, Nancy and her team be able to leverage both the technological ability and experience from DoSomething.org to help launch the Crisis Text Line.

The Crisis Text Line will use text messaging to connect teens with support and resources. The goal is to create a national (and ultimately international) infrastructure to ensure that teens can use SMS to get help 24/7.

By donating to this project, you will help that teen who is being bullied and feels they have no where to go. You will help the teen who is being sexually abused at home or the teen who has struggled with depression and is feeling suicidal. Your dollars could literally save lives.

Right now Crisis Text Line is crowdsourcing donations on Indiegogo. They are trying to raise funds to get the first phase of the project off the ground.

Please donate. $5, $25 or whatever you can to this cause. It doesn't matter how much. It just matters that YOU do something to help teens in crisis.


Global Youth: How Russian Parents View and Capitalize on Digital Media

image from digitalparentingrussia.com Have you ever wondered what technology do Russian kids use and when? How parents in Russia view the digital media impact on the child’s development? What role does media play for shared parent-child activity? And how all of this vary with different incomes and city sizes?

Digital trend consultancy Anketki Research has released a new study that looks to answer some of these questions (and more) as well as the current state of rapidly expanded digital media practices among Russian families.

The report provides a wealth of information, stats, facts and insight, associated with children, their parents, Internet and digital devices in Russia. The study was prepared on the basis of the initial survey conducted in March, 2012.

Digital Parenting Russia

Key Insights

  • Searching the internet has become the most popular shared activity for high-school children
  • Russian fathers show more enthusiasm with digital media usage for children as opposed to Russian mothers, whom prefer traditional media (TV, books, spoken word, music, etc).
  • E-books, mobile apps and online games are more frequently used and popular among male parents, who show heightened enthusiasm with digital potential and childhood development.
  • Currently, 30 million of Russian inhabitants are under age 19. For every one child in Russia there are 3 adults.
  • More than half of all women have only one child. Almost third of the woman have 2 kids. And 9% doesn’t have kids at all.