Piper Jaffray: Instagram is the Top Social Network for Teens

Instagram-logo1RSAccording to the latest Piper Jaffray "Taking Stock with Teens" report, American youth are continuing to gravitate to Instagram and away from Facebook. 

Roughly three-quarters of respondents reported using the visual platform, up from 69% in the previous survey. By comparison, just 45% said they use Facebook, a significant drop from 72%.

Jaffray Piper also reports that friends and the Internet dominate teen influences and combine in social media environments. Instagram and Twitter are the two most used social media sites, implying teens are increasingly visual and sound bite communicators.

The Taking Stock With Teens survey is a semi-annual research project comprised of gathering input from approximately 7,200 teens with an average age of 16.0 years.

Teen spending patterns, fashion trends, and brand and media preferences were assessed through visits to a geographically diverse subset of high schools across 11 states and 14 schools, as well as an online survey that included 41 states. 

Piper Jaffray has also prepared an infographic that shows some of the key highlights from the Fall 2014 survey.

Taking Stock with Teens Fall 2014


Trend Watch: Tenth Grade Tech Trends

image from www.debaird.netI ran across this really interesting essay over on Medium by Josh Miller, who interviewed his sister on the latest tech and social media trends at her high school.

Josh's findings dovetail with what I've heard in my own interviews with tweens and teens on the hows and why's of their social media habits.   

Take a peek into the mind of a teenager on social media to learn what's in (spoiler, not Facebook) and what's hot (rhymes with snap and cat).

Tenth Grade Tech Trends


White House: "15 Economic Facts about Millennials" [REPORT]

Millennial-tkoToday the White House released a report entitled “15 Economic Facts about Millennials” (pdf). This report takes an early look at this generation’s adult lives so far, including how they are faring in the labor market and how they are organizing their personal lives.

This generation is marked by transformations at nearly every important milestone: from changes in parenting practices and schooling choices, to the condition of the U.S. economy they entered, to their own choices about home and family. 

Millennials “15 Economic Facts about Millennials”Report

Related: All--Yes, all!--the charts from the White House Report on Millennials!


Come on #TeamInternet! Stop the Cycle of Mean.

image from cdn.thedailybeast.comThis morning I was shocked to read over on The Daily Beast that internet trolls were bullying the daughter of the late comedian, Robin Williams. What is wrong with people? Why would anyone think this is acceptable behavior to attack a grieving family or create images that are hurtful?

But here's the thing: Twitter and Instagram (and other online communities) can't do anything unless they know about it. So just like the post-9/11 mantra: If you see something, say something. If you see a cruel or mean comment on Instagram or Twitter---report it. Flag it. Stop the cycle of mean.

If you're part of these communities, it's your responsibility to help make it a safe and positive experience. Don't just scroll past the mean comments and think someone else will take care of it. Community management is difficult, for communities like Instagram it's a monumental task.

Be part of the solution and help squash the online trolls. Come on #TeamInternet, we are better than this. Stop the cycle of mean.

 

At a time when #TeamInternet could have harnessed its power for good by sending her and her family love and support, the trolls have brought more darkness into the lives of this grieving family.

I just can't fathom doing this to a family who is suffering such a huge loss under tragic circumstances. I have to believe that these evil trolls haven't personally been through the experience of losing a loved one. 

I just can't understand how anyone who has gone through that experience who would purposefully heap more suffering on to their broken hearts.


Trend Watch: TeenFacefeed

Jennifer-on-facefeed
Part SnapChat. Part Chatroulette. Part Secret. A dash of Instagram. Teens are going gaga for Facefeed

"This isn't OkCupid or Tinder. This is trying to replicate how you would meet someone at a party. 


You see faces of people (no name, no background info), and you can say 'hi' with a smile to anyone you feel looks interesting."

There's no profile to set up. Facefeed doesn't link with any of your social accounts. You just log in, take a selfie, and put it out there in the world.

If someone thinks your selfie looks nice, that person can write you a message. If you want to reply, you can. If you don't, you can block that person forever.

And if you become friends with that person, you can add them to a friends list, so you can write to each other as often as you'd like."


Read more at Business Insider

 

Noah: A 17-Minute Film Set Completely on Teen's Laptop [VIDEO]

image from moviesblog.mtv.comNoah, a short film that debuted at the Toronto International FIlm Festival, illustrates the flitting attention span and lack of true connection in digital culture more clearly than anything else in recent memory. (Warning: NSFW)

"These words are probably unfurling inside one of many open tabs on your computer screen. Perhaps one tab is for work, one is for chatting, and another is for Twitter. You probably even have some others open for no particular reason.

This is the way we receive information and the way we communicate now: constantly, simultaneously, compulsively, endlessly, and more and more often, solitarily. This strange new mode of living--and its indelible effect on our humanity--is perfectly captured in a new short film that debuted this week at the Toronto International Film Festival.



 

The 17-minute, mildly NSFW Noah is unlike anything you've seen before in a movie--only because it is exactly like what many of us see on our computers all the time. Created by Canadian film students Walter Woodman and Patrick Cederberg, the film begins when our high school senior protagonist types in the password that opens up his laptop, and the narrative takes place entirely on his computer screen.

It doesn't matter how far removed in age you are from the characters, if you are digitally savvy enough to be reading this, Noah will hit uncomfortably close to home."

Read the entire article over on FastCompany


Ellen DeGeneres' Epic Oscar Selfie [STATS]

Ellen.selfieEarlier today, Twitter released some stats showing just how much of a global social media reach the Academy Awards really had this year.

According to the Twitter Media team, in a 12-hour period starting around the start of red carpet coverage:

  • There were 19.1 million tweets sent about the Oscars that were viewed a total of 3.3 billion times all over the world.
  • Individually, 37 million people looked at all these tweets.
  • Those Tweets were sent by more than 5 million people.

Of course, the celebrity selfie was the absolute biggest moment of the night, and it has now been retweeted over three million times.

Ellenimpressions

Here are the stats Twitter collected for the selfie that broke the internet:

  • Seen by an audience across Twitter.com and Twitter’s mobile and desktop apps by 8.1 million people — a total of 26 million times.
  • It was also embedded on 13,711 web pages. Those embedded Tweets were seen 6.8 million times by 5 a.m. ET on Monday.
  • Together, the two make for a combined impressions figure of 32.8 million for Ellen’s Tweet.

Photo Credit: Ellen DeGeneres


Viacom: Kids of Today and Tomorrow Global Study [RESEARCH]

ViacomA new global research project conducted by Viacom International Media Networks (VIMN), surveyed over 6,200 kids aged 9-14 across 32 countries--one of the largest studies of its kind.

The “Kids of Today and Tomorrow Truly Global Exploration” study focused on what VIMN valls “last wavers,” or the youngest Millennials, born between 2003 and 2008. The findings point to several key traits that shape these kids’ world views and make them distinct from older members of this generational cohort.

 

Kids of today and tomorrow are more “we” than “me.”

The youngest Millennials extend their positive spirit to also include a commitment to community and the wider world around them.

  • 88% believe it’s important to help people in the community, with 61% having taken part in an effort to raise money for charity in the past year.
  • 94% believe it’s people’s responsibility to protect the environment.

Advances in digital media play a large part in broadening horizons and inspiring kids to use the power they have at their fingertips in a positive manner:

  • 85% agree “my age group has the potential to change the world for the better.”
  • 71% agree “having access to the internet changes the way I think about the world.”

However, they don’t see this as anything out of the ordinary or think of themselves as “techy”:

  • 2 out of 3 kids think that being connected is as much a part of everyday life as eating and sleeping – it’s simply how life is today. As a consequence of being constantly connected in a fast-moving world, it is natural for them to constantly adapt and be open-minded. They are resilient and life-ready.

Implications:

  • To reach these confident kids, it is important to communicate with them with a tone of positivity, smart but not cynical humor; and a playful approach, in line with the fun and happiness they seek in life.
  • Kids respond best to authentic brand messages: they recognize when someone is trying to sell them, so be honest.
  • It’s important to be both globally and locally relevant.

Kids of today and tomorrow are grounded.

Authenticity is a key value for kids today and they live with their feet firmly on the ground.

  • 94% report wanting to be true to the close circle around them and 93% to be true to themselves. When it comes to the people who inspire them or the people they trust most, it’s all about close family and friends. They might feel inspired by celebrities and sports stars, but they know not to trust them.
  • 49% of the youngest Millennials name a family member as their #1 best friend– rising as high as 90% in Morocco and 87% in Brazil.

Kids of today and tomorrow are confident.

Today’s youngest Millennials are overwhelmingly happy and optimistic.

  • 88% consider themselves very happy, with happiness levels in this age group increasing over last six years.
  • Spending time with family and friends is the top factor generating happiness in most countries. Young Millennials enjoy doing activities together as a family.
  • Humor is important to young Millennials, who use it strategically to navigate life: 64% agree “I use humor to help me get my way.”
  • Happiness outweighs stress by a factor of 3 to 1: while almost 9 in 10 young Millennials describe themselves as very happy, only 24% report high levels of stress, with stress levels falling since 2006.

Kids today are re-calibrating their sense of what it is to be stressed as well as happy: they have grown up in a world of constant change and global economic crisis – for them, this is the norm.

  • Even in Greece, where the economic crisis is particularly acute, stress levels are only 36%. The highest stress levels among 9-14s are actually in Singapore and China (41% and 39%) – caused almost certainly by the highly pressured education systems in those countries.
  • In general, the youngest Millennials are characterized by an optimism with which they approach challenges: 90% agree “I can accomplish anything if I work hard enough” and 89% agree “I always try to be positive.”

At the global level, these high levels of happiness, low stress and growing positivity are combining to form a “virtuous circle” of mutual support that helps kids create an overall sense of confidence.

  • Belief in themselves: 65% believe not only that they are smart but also that they are smarter than other people.
  • Belief in their future: Despite everything, a large majority (84%) believe they will earn more than their parents
  • Belief in their generation: This is the winning generation … the expression “#winning” suits them perfectly and is acknowledged by many more 9-14s than by older Millennials (77% vs. 66% of 15-30s)
  • Belief in their creativity: 89% believe their creativity will help them to keep on winning in a fast-paced world.

Kids of today and tomorrow are simultaneously more and less sheltered.

The difference is very clearly defined: in the real world, they are much more sheltered than in the past, with parents restricting and controlling their interactions with everything. However, given advances in technology and access to a wide range of devices, there is often relatively little protection – kids have unprecedented exposure to global ideas and images.

  • 43% own their own computer/laptop and 28% own a smartphone.
  • 61% have a social media account (and 11 years is the average age for having a first account – despite being below the age threshold set by many social platforms’ Terms & Conditions).
  • 9-14s have 39 online “friends” they have never met (up from five since 2006).

Kids of today and tomorrow are proud to be.

The youngest Millennials are increasingly expressing a sense of affinity with their country. Their sense of national pride is growing stronger and they are more likely than six years ago to believe it’s important to maintain their country’s traditions.

  • 87% agree that they are “proud to be [their ethnicity]” up from 81% in 2006.
  • 79% agree “it’s important to maintain my country’s traditions,” up from 60% in 2006.
  • At the same time, they are tolerant of other cultures: 74% think it’s great to have people from other countries living in the kid’s country.

Methodology

This VIMN study is based on 6,200 interviews with the 9-14 age group (at the time of research, born 1998-2003, which we have defined as “last wavers” within the Millennial generation) across 32 countries (Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, US, Canada, France, Spain, Italy, Portugal, Greece, UK, Germany, Netherlands, Sweden, Russia, Hungary, Poland, China, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines, Australia, New Zealand, India, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Morocco, Nigeria and South Africa).

Video is also available in the following languages:


Tess Explains It All: Teens, Social Media and the Myth of Internet Addiction

image from www.clubfemina.comEarlier today I ran across a really insightful (and spot on!) article, written by high school student Tess Harkin, for Huffington Post Teen. In her post, Tess tackles the widely held narrative that teens are 'addicted' to technology and as a result, aren't engaging in real life human connection.

Tess explains the relationship between teens and social media and how it actually does facilliate and foster relationships (IRL!) with her peers

Turns out, when it comes to teens and technology, they're mostly misunderstood.

 "It's almost too easy to agree with the majority and think, "People are right, technology is destroying the human connection." But I think just the opposite.

Technology brings people together. Shocking, I know? It sounds like some crazy marketing ploy, and many commercials support that. But the fact is, it's the truth.

I can talk to one of my friends in California, Canada or Taiwan with the touch of a button. Technology has helped me forge lifelong connection with people I would have lost touch with ordinarily. I can say I talk to more people now, whether it be through Facebook, texting or tweeting, than I did three years ago. And for the argument that nothing compares to face-to-face conversation?

I'd love to engage and be a part of that, but the fact of the matter is, without Skype or Google Hangouts, I wouldn't be able talk to a large portion of my friends. I'm not trying to advocate for technology to replace all forms of in person conversation, I'm just trying to suggest the stigma attached to it isn't necessarily just."

You can read the entire Huffington Teen post here.


ZABRA #BeCyberAware Twitter Chat: Social Media and Digital Parenting Resource List

Becyberaware

One of the things I enjoy most about my work is having the opportunity to talk with parents, educators and brands to dispel some of the myths or fears around teen use of social media.

Tonight I’m going to be participating in a digital parenting Twitter chat hosted by Zabra that will be moderated by Josh Shipp.

The event starts at 7pm EST and you can participate through the hashtag #BeCyberAware. I hope you’ll join us for a lively and informative discussion.

No matter the audience, my message is pretty consistent: Don't panic! I'm frequently asked to share some of my favorite digital teens & parenting links, tips and other resources.

So here we go! I've sorted through my bookmarks and tweets and put together this (hopefully) handy handout. Feel free to tweet it or share it with anyone you think would find it helpful.

.:SOCIAL MEDIA & TEENS RESOURCES:.

Cyberbullying: A Sociological Approach  http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2013/04/cyberbullying-a-sociological-approach.html

Young Adults Communication on Social Media
http://www.scribd.com/doc/31555455/Young-Adults-Communication-on-Social-Networking-Websites

INFOGRAPHIC: Golden Rules for Social Media Use by Teens  http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2013/07/infographic-golden-rules-for-social-media-use-by-teens.html

INFOGRAPHIC: Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & Snapchat –How Teens Use Social Media  http://www.businessinsider.com/infographic-how-facebook-could-be-unraveled-by-mobile-first-teens-2013-4

Southern Poverty Law Center | There Are No Bullies http://www.tolerance.org/magazine/number-45-fall-2013/there-are-no-bullies

Southern Poverty Law Center | Bullying Quiz http://www.tolerance.org/lesson/bullying-quiz

Facebook Lets Teens Post Publicly: Why That's a Good Thing http://huff.to/19QNvvK

Digital Citizenship Includes Rights as Well as Responsibilities http://huff.to/9JoWlm

Beware of the Internet Safety Industrial Complex http://www.connectsafely.org/beware-internet-safety-industrial-complex/

INFOGRAPHIC: How Millennials Are Using Social Media for Good  http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2013/10/infographic-millennials-use-social-media-for-good.html

INFOGRAPHIC: Teens, Social Media & Privacy  http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2013/05/infographic-teens-social-media-and-privacy.html

Alert: Your SnapChat Photos Aren’t So Secret http://www.businessinsider.com/alert-your-secret-snapchat-relationships-arent-so-secret-2013-9

 

.: FACEBOOK RESOURCES:.

Facebook for Educators & Community Leaders Guide  http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2013/10/facebook-for-educators-and-youth-community-workers-guide.html  

Facebook for Educators Handouts
http://www.scribd.com/collections/2978485/Facebook-101

Facebook 101: Digital Citizenship
http://www.scribd.com/doc/66447985/Facebook-101-Digital-Citizenship

It’s Always Sunny on Facebook
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/cat-del-valle-castellanos/its-always-sunny-on-faceb_b_4150090.html?

 

.: RESOURCES FOR YOUTH IN CRISIS:.

The CDC reports that 60 percent of high school students claim that they have though about committing suicide, and around nine percent of them say that they have tried killing themselves at least once.

Whatever the causes of teen suicide, it is important to note that the pressures of teenage living can lead to suicide. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL):

  • 19.3 percent of high school students have seriously considered killing themselves.

  • 14.5 percent of high school students made actual plans for committing suicide,

  • 900,000 youth planned their suicides during an episode of major depression.

Many times parents may not know that their child is suffering from depression or suicidal thoughts. There are so many resources available for teens in crisis. Here are some organizations leading the charge to help teens in crisis.

It's important to have the discussion with your kids to let them know if they or one of their friends are suffering from depression or threatening to harm themselves they need to immediately tell an adult, teacher or direct them to one of these crisis providers. If they feel there is an eminent threat, call 911.

Facebook 101: How To Report Suicidal Intentions http://www.scribd.com/doc/75718714/Facebook-101-How-to-Report-Suicidal-Expressions

Crisis Text Line: Get Help Now http://www.crisistextline.org/get-help-now/

ReachOut USA http://us.reachout.com/

Trevor Project: Warning Signs of Suicide http://www.thetrevorproject.org/pages/warning-signs  

Trevor Project: Get Help Now http://www.thetrevorproject.org/pages/get-help-now

To Write Love on Her Arms: Get Help Now http://twloha.com/find-help

 

.: RESOURCES ON TV & OTHER MEDIA:.

Real to Me: Girls and Reality TV http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2011/11/real-to-me-girls-and-reality-tv.html

Reality TV Tip Sheet for Parents http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2011/11/real-to-me-reality-tv-tip-sheet-for-parents.html

What Pop Culture is Teaching Your Boys About Masculinity  http://www.blogtalkradio.com/progressive-parenting/2011/04/19/what-pop-culture-is-teaching-your-boys-about-masculinity

Boys, the Media and Body Image: An Open Letter to The Ellen Show http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2011/04/media-boys-body-image-pop-culture-an-open-letter-to-the-ellen-show.html

 

.:DIGITAL PARENTING RESOURCES:.

Parents Guide to Facebook
http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2010/11/a-parents-guide-to-facebook.html

48% of Parents Believe the Internet is a Good Contribution to Their Children’s Lives http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2012/02/survey-48-of-parents-believe-the-internet-is-a-good-contribution-to-their-childrens-lives.html

Social Networking Tips for Parents http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2010/10/social-networking-facebook-privacy-tips-for-parents.html

Empowering Parents Through Technology http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2010/09/research-empowering-parents-through-technology.html

Facebook Security and Safety Resources for Parents http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2010/04/facebook-security-and-safety-resources-for-parents-teachers-teens.html

Facebook for Parents http://www.facebookforparents.org/

Connecting with the Facebook Parenting Duo
https://www.facebook.com/notes/facebook/connecting-with-bj-fogg-and-linda-fogg-phillips-the-facebook-parenting-duo/96616137130

Why Anti-Bullying Programs Are Failing http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2013/02/why-anti-bullying-programs-are-failing-brooks-gibbs.html

INFOGRAPHIC: School Bullying http://www.debaird.net/blendededunet/2012/01/infographic-school-bullying.html

What Parents Need to Know About Ask.fm & Kik http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/parents-know-ask-fm-kik-144900812.html


Study: Tweets Can Cause a Significant Increase in Viewership [INFOGRAPHIC]

Twitter-tvNielsen has released its Twitter TV ratings, showing that there has been a 38 percent increase in tweets about TV in the US over the last year — from 190 million in Q2 2012 to 263 million in Q2 2013.

The number of Twitter TV authors in the US has also risen 24 percent, from 15 million to 19 million in the same period.

At first glance, the data also shows that the Twitter audience for an average TV episode is 50 times larger than the number of authors who are tweeting.

This means that if 2,000 people are tweeting about a TV show, 100,000 people are seeing those tweets, Social Guide – part of NM Incite, a joint venture between Nielsen and McKinsey — explains.

As Twitter inches closer to its IPO, TV will be a huge part of what it does to appeal to advertisers and in turn, investors. In August, a new study from Nielsen concluded that tweets can cause a “significant increase” in viewership of broadcast TV programs 29 percent of the time.

Here’s an infographic that Social Guide has published. (via)

 

image from cdn1.tnwcdn.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View LARGE


INFOGRAPHIC: How Millennials Use Technology & Social Media for Good

We’re all familiar with the negative stereotypes associated with young adults and technology. But did you know they're actually using their devices to make a difference? 

Are Millennials Using Technology for Good?

View LARGE


Trend Watch: Disney's 'Little Mermaid' Second Screen Live iPad Experiment

Little.mermaid.second-screen-live-disneyWhile broadcasters, social networking and tech start-ups have been experimenting with second screen and other social entertainement experiences, they've been pretty much confined to TV viewing at home through social tv apps (like GetGlue or IntoNow) or social networks (Facebook and Twitter).

Disney aims to change that by bringing an interactive and second screen experience to the movie theatre!

On September 20th, Disney Studios wants you to bring your iPad with you to the special screenings of The Little Mermaid to interact with the film, play games, sing along, find new surprises and compete with other audience members.

 

Introducing finderyU

FinderyUheader
Findery, and the world, is your classroom!

While it may seem like you just wrapped up finals, packed up the classroom and headed for a well-deserved summer break, the (sad) truth is a new semester is right around the corner!

As you sit on that beach, you may be wondering how can you incorporate more project-based learning activities into your course syllabus and grab the attention of your students who, let’s be honest, have the attention span of a gnat.

Even if you’re not currently enrolled in college, Findery is a powerful informal learning platform where you can tap into the collective knowledge hidden in Findery Notes and learn (or share!)  more about Australia, space travel, candy, San Francisco architecture or anything else that matters to you!

Introducing Findery University

Today I am happy to share the launch of Findery University!

Findery, is a geo-location based website where anyone can share local knowledge, hidden secrets, stories and information about the world around you. Using Findery, your students (or you!) can annotate places in the real world, leave media rich (YouTube videos, SoundCloud audio, Instagram and your own images) notes tagged to a specific geographic location.

You can even embed Findery notes into your class blog or website or share them via Twitter or on your classroom Facebook or Google+ page.

Findery for Students

Findery is a great way to create a multimedia project for just about any class. Demonstrate your learning by adding notes infused with video, images and text along the paths of your explorations. Ask your classmates to contribute their reflections, narrative feedback and resources on your Findery project through the comments.

Be sure to follow @Campus on Findery to discover and contribute notes about student life and campus history. Your notes could capture memories with your friends or pay it forward by joining the Findery Campus Challenge and leaving tips for your current and future classmates!

Findery University for Educators

Here are a few examples of how you can use Findery University to support formal and informal learning:

  • Studying community supported agriculture?  Investigate and map local food in your area, then leave notes for food sources with commentary on sustainability.

  • Have writer’s block?  Explore the notes in a particular region and build a story around the local knowledge of that place.

  • If you teach American Literature, create a Set that has Notes with facts, images or videos for books or authors included on your course reading list.

  • Encourage observation through illustrating places.  Go on a sketching excursion and post a note with the picture of your sketch.  Tag your notes with #sketchproject to contribute to urban sketching fans on Findery.

  • Use Findery as a way to create a living history map. Share a picture of your ancestors at the docks in Liverpool with an excerpt from their diary talking about how they feel about leaving England for America. 

    Share a note with a video clip  about the hazards of transatlantic boat travel in the 1800s and include a passage from their diary about the challenges they faced during the journey. Bring your family history to life!

Enroll in finderyU

  1. Go to findery.com

  2. Click "Sign Up!" and follow the prompts. Don't be afraid of the FAQs

  3. Update your settings, jump in and create your first note, or just start exploring

  4. Download the free Findery University handout, or check out more lesson plan ideas at www.findery.com/university

It will be exciting to see how educators use Findery in the classroom, student projects or for your amazing passion projects!

Findery wants to share your Notes and lesson plans with our educator community. Send a tweet @finderyU or share the link on the Findery Facebook page, so they can share your FinderyU contributions!

And, oh--you can find me on Findery, here


Study: 63% of College Students Actively Using Facebook or Twitter While Watching TV

Mobile is having the biggest impact on how college students apportion their screen time. Daily time spent on the computer and watching TV decreased in 2013, while daily time spent with the mobile phone and tablet were up by about 18 minutes each, compared with 2012.

But even if daily time spent watching TV is diminishing, a considerable 60% of college students reported owning a flat-screen TV; and TV viewing was still a major portion of students’ media time, clocking in at 2.8 hours per day. While time spent on the computer or mobile may be higher, activity on these devices can run the gamut—from using a word processing program for schoolwork to making a phone call.

image from www.emarketer.com

By comparison, when students turn on the TV, it is to watch a program, even if using other devices is a corollary part of the experience.

The study found that eight out of 10 college students reported using a second screen at least a few times a week while watching TV. Only 13% did so less than once a week, or not at all.

The most popular activity students engaged in while watching TV was using Facebook or Twitter, at 63% of respondents. Social TV can be boon to TV marketers and advertisers, but there is always the possibility that social networks are merely distractions from TV content.

Surfing the web was the next most common activity while watching TV, at 58% of respondents, while half also reported playing games. Schoolwork wasn’t completely forgotten while students vegged out in front of the television, though—37% said they did homework or research while watching TV.

And in a sign that the second screen may be an opportunity for TV marketers and advertisers to gain student viewers’ extra attention, about one-quarter of students looked up the TV schedule on a second screen, and about the same percentage shopped. (Source)