Camp Google

Camp GoogleCamp Google is a free summer camp that gets kids learning through fun, interactive science activities and adventures.

Led by experts, the activities have been designed to encourage kids to ask questions, setting them on a lifelong journey of exploration and discovery.

Starting Monday, kids can join Camp Google for free! Khan Academy, National Geographic, NASA, and the National Park Service teamed up to make a great experience!

 


Trend Watch: Facebook Freebooting

Slate has a really interesting article, Freebooting: Stolen YouTube Videos Go Viral on Facebook, that dives into a new phenomenon where YouTube videos are stolen and then uploaded to Facebook.

As one YouTube creator described it: 

"In May, he posted a YouTube video on how to make gummy candies in the shape of Legos, and it garnered about 600,000 views in the first 24 hours.

Meanwhile, on Facebook, someone else’s ripped version of his video was approaching 10 million views. “The worst thing is just the shock of how viral they go on Facebook compared to the ones I post on YouTube.” 

 


STUDY: The Role of Social Media and Technology in Peer Bullying

image from www.apa.orgRecently published research in the journal Psychology of Violence,  from the University of New Hampshire Crimes Against Children Research Center (CCRC),  – “The Role of Technology in Peer Harassment: Does It Amplify Harm for Youth?” (pdf)  conducted a survey  of 791 young people aged 10-20 to find out the role of technology and social media in peer bullying.

The big take away from the study is that the negative impact of online bullying is "significantly lowerthan bullying behaviors that occur face-to-face.

  • "...That those seeking to prevent the most detrimental forms of peer harassment might focus less on cyberbullying per se and instead [consider] prevention programs that teach youth to handle negative feelings and to de-escalate tensions."
  • Compared with in-person incidents, technology-only incidents were less likely to involve multiple episodes and power imbalances.
     
  • They were seen by victims as easier to stop and had significantly less emotional impact.” So, no, the idea that tech amplifies harm, is not supported by the data."

While many researchers have been concerned that cyberbullying could actually be worse than facing a victim offline and in person, the study actually provided opposite results.

"Technology-only incidents were less likely than in-person only incidents to result in injury, involve a social power differential and to have happened a series of times," Kimberly J. Mitchell, lead author of the study, said in a news release.

"Mixed episodes, those that involved both in-person and technology elements, were more likely than technology-only episodes to involve perpetrators who knew embarrassing things about the victim, happen a series of times, last for one month or longer, involve physical injury and start out as joking before becoming more serious. It is these mixed episodes that appear to be the most distressing to youth."

This study represents a big shift in thinking about social media bullying and should make everyone involved in working with kids and teens shift more focus on to the bullying behaviors that take place in the classroom, home and playground.

The Role of Technology in Peer Harassment: Does It Amplify Harm for Youth?

 


STUDY: The Impact of 'Sesame Street' On Your Kids [INFOGRAPHIC]

The most authoritative study ever done on the impact of “Sesame Street,” finds that the famous show on public TV has delivered lasting educational benefits to millions of American children — benefits as powerful as the ones children get from going to preschool.

The paper from the University of Maryland’s Melissa Kearney and Wellesley College’s Phillip Levine finds that the show has left children more likely to stay at the appropriate grade level for their age, an effect that is particularly pronounced among boys, African Americans and children who grow up in disadvantaged areas.

image from www.washingtonpost.com


Why Not Us? Roadtrip Nation Documentary Film

RNBeing the first in your family to attend college is daunting, but rewarding. Follow the journeys of four young people—all first in their families to go to college—as they road-trip across the country to interview inspiring individuals who were also first in their families to pursue higher education.

 

After gaining wisdom and guidance from trail-blazing leaders—including Anna Maria Chávez, CEO of Girl Scouts of the USA, Grammy Award-winner John Legend, and Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz—the Roadtrippers are emboldened to embrace the opportunities ahead and ask “why shouldn’t I succeed?”


Oculus Story Studio: Meet Henry

Henry.oculus.story.studioOne of the strongest applications of VR is its potential for emotional connection through character driven storytelling. Turns out the team at Oculus also see's the power of digital and virtual storytelling on a platform like Oculus.

 

Oculus Story Studio’s latest VR experience, ‘Henry’, a heartwarming comedy about a loveable hedgehog, coming later this year. ‘Henry’ is directed by Ramiro Lopez Dau, whose work includes animation on films such as Pixar’s Brave and Monsters University.

 

Meet Henry from Story Studio on Vimeo.

Henry is a lonely, spikey hedgehog who is having some trouble finding friends, and I can't wait to tell his heartwarming story. Oculus Story Studio has recently announced that they will be premiering "Henry" in Hollywood on July 28th.

You can meet Henry by visiting oculus.com/storystudio/henry


Smartphone Use, Addiction, Narcissism, and Personality: A Mixed Methods Investigation

Cyber.behavior.psychology.learning

There are increasing numbers of people who are now using smartphones. Consequently, there is a risk of addiction to certain web applications such as social networking sites (SNSs) which are easily accessible via smartphones. There is also the risk of an increase in narcissism amongst users of SNSs.
 
The present study set out to investigate the relationship between smartphone use, narcissistic tendencies and personality as predictors of smartphone addiction. The study also aimed to investigate the distinction between addiction specificity and co-occurrence in smartphone addiction via qualitative data and discover why people continue to use smartphones in banned areas. 
 
A self-selected sample of 256 smartphone users (Mean age = 29.2, SD = 9.49) completed an online survey. The results revealed that 13.3% of the sample was classified as addicted to smartphones. Higher narcissism scores and neuroticism levels were linked to addiction. Three themes of social relations, smartphone dependence and self-serving personalities emerged from the qualitative data. 

Interpretation of qualitative data supports addiction specificity of the smartphone. It is suggested smartphones encourage narcissism, even in non-narcissistic users. In turn, this increased use in banned areas. 

Future research needs to gather more in-depth qualitative data, addiction scale comparisons and comparison of use with and without SNS access. It is advised that prospective buyers of smartphones be pre-warned of the potential addictive properties of new technology.


Piper Jaffray: Instagram is the Top Social Network for Teens

Instagram-logo1RSAccording to the latest Piper Jaffray "Taking Stock with Teens" report, American youth are continuing to gravitate to Instagram and away from Facebook. 

Roughly three-quarters of respondents reported using the visual platform, up from 69% in the previous survey. By comparison, just 45% said they use Facebook, a significant drop from 72%.

Jaffray Piper also reports that friends and the Internet dominate teen influences and combine in social media environments. Instagram and Twitter are the two most used social media sites, implying teens are increasingly visual and sound bite communicators.

The Taking Stock With Teens survey is a semi-annual research project comprised of gathering input from approximately 7,200 teens with an average age of 16.0 years.

Teen spending patterns, fashion trends, and brand and media preferences were assessed through visits to a geographically diverse subset of high schools across 11 states and 14 schools, as well as an online survey that included 41 states. 

Piper Jaffray has also prepared an infographic that shows some of the key highlights from the Fall 2014 survey.

Taking Stock with Teens Fall 2014